User login

Calendar

S M T W T F S
 
 
 
 
 
1
 
2
 
3
 
4
 
5
 
6
 
7
 
8
 
9
 
10
 
11
 
12
 
13
 
14
 
15
 
16
 
17
 
18
 
19
 
20
 
21
 
22
 
23
 
24
 
25
 
26
 
27
 
28
 
29
 
30
 
ECOLOGY, & ENVIRONMENT
ECOLOGY, & ENVIRONMENT
warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home/climatec/public_html/modules/taxonomy/taxonomy.pages.inc on line 33.
Ecology and Wildlife
WHY LONGMONT MUST ACT NOW TO RE-ENVISION THE ST. VRAIN RIVER CORRIDOR.

THE ST. VRAIN RIVER CORRIDOR – LONGMONT’S GREATEST WASTED ASSET!
Why re-envisioning Longmont’s St. Vrain River Corridor from an industrial-commercial no-man’s land to a vital, thriving, high-density, mixed-used, transit-oriented, “smart-growth” corridor is vital to do now!
WHY NOW, WHY LONGMONT, WHY THE ST. VRAIN? –
THE TOP TEN DOZEN REASONS, - EXPLAINED:

5
Your rating: None Average: 5 (1 vote)
City staff presentation to City Council re. the St. Vrain Corridor, at the 2011 annual retreat

Click the above link to view the City Planning Department's - staff presentation to City Council regarding the  St. Vrain Corridor topic as discussed at the 2011 annual City Council retreat at the Xilinx Center.   This links to a PDF presentation given to the Council as background before there Saturday afternoon discussion.  Contains background and executive summary.

0
Your rating: None
Denver Studies the value of redeveloping land along the river corridors.

Denver continues to reap the benefits of its visionary efforts to re-imagine and rediscover the SOUTH PLATTE RIVER CORRIDOR. This study explores the nearly $5 BILLION dollar potential impact of this initiative, both past and future.

This link opens a pdf file booklet that "outlines what we believe is a visionary concept: to redefine and transform thousands of acres of under-utilized or distressed commercial, industrial and residential real estate assets (Red Fields) through the creation of public park land (Green Fields) in the Denver metro area."

0
Your rating: None
Tennessee Riverpark Master Plan

History The most comprehensive and inclusive planning process ever undertaken in Chattanooga and Hamilton County was accomplished between 1982 and 2005.......... ....Following hundreds of public and private meetings involving thousands of citizens, the Tennessee Riverpark Master Plan was completed in March 1985 and later presented to an overflow crowd at the then new Chattanooga-Hamilton County Convention and Trade Center. The visionary plan advised that the Chattanooga riverfront was owned by everyone and should be developed "under a guiding idea which will bring its banks to life, make it a central point of pride for the City's people, and move it to the forefront of national consciousness".

5
Your rating: None Average: 5 (1 vote)
Riverwalks Article on Wikipedia

Visit this Wikipedia article for links to Riverwalk projects in the US and throughout the world.

0
Your rating: None
Sustainable Development

Sustainable development (SD) is a pattern of resource use that aims to meet human needs while preserving the environment so that these needs can be met not only in the present, but also for generations to come.

Text is made available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License.

0
Your rating: None
Breckenridge Riverwalk

River Restoration:
The Town has been working on Blue River restoration since the early 1990's. The Blue River was largely made up of dredge rock piles through Town until restoration began. Now the Town has restored the Blue River to a natural river environment which makes its way through the center of Town

0
Your rating: None
St. Vrain Creek "Corridor Commitee" promotes streamflow

"ST. VRAIN CORRIDOR COMMITEE" promotes upper St.Vrain streamflows.

0
Your rating: None
Get a sense of the FLOODPLAIN.

The SAINT VRAIN's FLOODPLAIN:
Hold out one hand. Let the length of your hand roughly represent the "NATURAL" width of a 100 Year Flood, that is - if a flood had occurred through the Longmont area 200 years ago, before roads and bridges were built.  While meandering, and sometimes splitting, this was on average typically about 300 feet wide.  
NOW - hold your arms out side-to-side, hands extended.  This represents the width of the current 100 year flood, -  over 3,000 feet wide at spots, if it were to occur tomorrow!  Why the difference between the current and the historic widths you may ask?  The answer is that it is a result of a lack of understanding of the impact of bridges and roads built years ago, as well as encroachments upon the river's natural banks by various construction projects over the years.
The Campaign St. Vrain initiative is about 'RESTORATION". 

Livable Communities: Walking, Working, Water

The AIA explores the vital role of water in creating community.

0
Your rating: None
RocketTheme Drupal Themes